BMW CAFE RACER e CUSTOM BIKES

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MensagemEnviado: 02 Out 2015 08:35
amandio Escreveu:Luis Moto Pisa, Italy

2014 RnineT - BMW R NINET SCRAMBLER, ITALIAN STYLE


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Recuperando este post, o canal do YouTube Racer TV (canal produzido e realizado por um português) vez a revisão desta mota.
https://youtu.be/5JCKdkVmvfc
Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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MensagemEnviado: 16 Dez 2015 11:51
Está fantástica! Puro estilo....
Luis David

KDX 125
XT 600
TT 600
KTM 620
Aprilia Pegaso 650
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Grande maquinão.

Se me sair a lotaria, vem uma morar cá "pra garage".
Abraço
Eduardo Filipe

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"Posso não voltar...,mas vou...!!!"
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Uma BMW F800GS muito especial!


Fruto da imaginação da sua proprietária, uma artista de Chicago que adora o fora de estrada, esta é uma moto com muito cabedal.

Casey Gunschel é uma motociclista e uma autodidata que trabalha em marroquinaria, sendo especializada em costumização de peças para design de interiores. Em busca de um projecto pessoal diferente, resolveu cobrir a sua “GS 800” com pele gravada à mão, com motivos inspirados na mística e antiga cultura nativa americana.

Durante dois meses esticou, gravou, cortou e colou os painéis de cabedal que deram à sua moto o aspecto único que pode ver nas imagens, e que para se manter bonito, mesmo depois de passar uns dias a fazer todo-o-terreno, basta aplicar na pele um pouco de produto condicionador.

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Abraço
Eduardo Filipe

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"Posso não voltar...,mas vou...!!!"
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Eduardo Filipe

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"Posso não voltar...,mas vou...!!!"
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Reavivando este tópico :D

By Ronna and Benna Norén of Unique Custom Cycles Sweden

BMW REMAKES THE ICONIC R5


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Eighty years ago, BMW revealed the groundbreaking R5—a machine that influenced motorcycle design right up to the 1950s, and still casts a spell over custom builders.

Today, at the Villa d’Este on the shores of Lake Como in Italy, BMW has just revealed the modern-day Hommage—designed in–house, and built with the help of Swedish master craftsmen Ronna and Benna Norén of Unique Custom Cycles.

The Hommage is an intriguing (and drop-dead gorgeous) blend of historic design cues and modern custom building techniques.

“In today’s world, it is very simple to keep it complicated, but very complicated to keep it simple,” says Ola Stenegärd, BMW’s Head of Vehicle Design

“The BMW R5 captured the very essence of a motorcycle. Our aim was to transport that clarity and elegant aesthetic appeal to the modern era—creating a respectful combination of old-school and high-tech with a dash of high performance.”

We’re pleased to hear that no original R5s were damaged or pillaged in the making of this machine.

At the core of the build is an original 500 cc R5 boxer engine provided by enthusiast Sebastian Gutsch—an engine that was damaged in a race and is now restored to better than new.

The rest of the BMW R5 has been elaborately handcrafted from scratch. Working off specifications provided by the BMW Motorrad design team, the Norén brothers used their thirty years of bike-building experience to produce the parts needed to bring the Hommage to life.

That includes the valve covers and the breastplate of the boxer engine, which were machined from billet aluminum based on sketches, plus engine and gearbox internals.

The frame, fuel tank and rear fender are unique, though, making this a genuine custom bike that captures the purism of the original R5.

Put the original and the Hommage side by side, and you can see subtle differences. The frame and fuel tank of the Hommage echo the elegant drop shapes of the originals, but with more modern, streamlined shapes.

The steering head has been tilted back slightly, giving the Hommage a more rakish presence and underscoring its place in the custom world.

But the oval shaped frame tubing remains, configured to draw a continuous line from the steering head to the rear wheel hub. The hand-made steel rear fender is classic bobber-style minimalism.

The original BMW R5 used telescopic forks—a radical move at the time—with aerodynamically shaped covers.

The Hommage uses modern custom-made forks, with a slight crease on the covers to echo the ribs on the engine breastplate and valve covers.

The bar-end brake and clutch levers are also custom-made, combining the look of traditional reversed levers with the adjustment options of modern controls.

Eighty years ago, the R5 had a power output of 26 hp. Impressive for the time, but obviously not going to cut it today. So a one-off supercharger has been plumbed into the restored motor.

At the other end, a stainless steel exhaust system releases the pressure—and provides an appropriate audio clue to the increase in power.

The rear suspension has been built from scratch, and there’s a modern piston brake system to help keep the rubber side down, hooked up to minimalist front and rear wheel hubs.

There could be only one color to finish this bike in—the classic BMW black, with white pinstripes.

But it’s been interpreted in contemporary style: the layers of paint give an opaque effect, with a ‘smoke’ finish on the fuel tank and rear fender that allows a glimpse of the steel underneath to show through.

Look even closer, and you’ll see a hint of metallic shine and a slight flake effect.

An embossed, hand-stitched leather seat looks like it has been lifted straight from the 1930s.

The aluminum engine and gearbox cases have been glass-bead blasted. The matt finish contrasts beautifully with the highly polished engine breastplate and valve covers, reminiscent of the R5 originals.

The BMW R5 Hommage is a tour-de-force of re-engineering and custom design. We never thought we’d see an ‘official’ custom to rival the Concept 90 R NineT, revealed at the Villa d’Este exactly three years ago. But BMW have once again pulled a rabbit out of their hats.


Fonte: BIKE EXIF

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Artigo completo e detalhado na página oficial da BMW Motorrad

http://brand.bmw-motorrad.com/en/storie ... mmage.html
Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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PRAËM Paris

PRAËM X BMW S 1000 RR


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THE PURSUIT OF PERFEKTION

If you enjoy getting your arms yanked out of their sockets, the BMW S 1000 RR is a dream machine. With 199 stout German horses under the tank, it’s one of the fastest road-going bikes in the world. It’s also one of the easiest superbikes to ride—making it the weapon of choice for trainers like the California Superbike School.

So how do you improve on this perfektion? BMW Motorrad France decided to find out. They’ve given an S 1000 RR to PRAËM, the Paris-based custom house that first wowed us with its futuristic Honda RC51.

PRAËM is run by brothers Sylvain and Florent Berneron, both in their mid-20s. They come from a racing family, and have always been star-struck by the track machines of the 1970s and 1980s.

They’ve decided to build a different kind of custom—one still based on personal interpretation, but without screwing up the base bike.

“This is about performance and style, not just style,” says Sylvain. This BMW still scythes through bends with authority, but looks like no other Double-R.

‘Optimus PRAËM’ is clothed in sleek new bodywork inspired by the endurance racers of the 1980s. The paint is a homage to the first of the famous BMW Art Cars, the Alexander Calder BMW 3.0 CSL that raced in the 1975 24 Hours of Le Mans. And gives a hint at how the RR should be ridden…

The three-quarter fairing is especially elegant, and worlds away from sharp-edged, modern design trends. It’s based on a Suzuka 8-hour bike, with one headlight on the right-hand side, and modified to fit the S 1000 RR—with a new ram air inlet system at the front.

You can find other classic endurance styling cues in the tail section—similar in style to iconic machines like the Suzuki XR69. (There’s a custom subframe and battery carrier underneath.)

The engine covers are also custom, and designed to replicate the casings from the seventies.

The aluminum fuel tank is a heavily modified stock tank. It’s around 50mm (two inches) longer than standard, and with a new upper section that now houses a Stäubli endurance-style quick-fill fuel cap system.

The carbon wheels are reminiscent of classic Dymag alloys. Manufactured by Rotobox, they knock a healthy five kilos (11 lbs.) off the unsprung weight. Further reductions come from Sicom carbon-ceramic brake discs, and the brakes and coolant hoses all feature Stäubli quick release connectors.

So what hasn’t changed? The suspension and swingarm are both stock, to retain the electronic adjustment.

The engine internals are also unchanged, since there is more than enough power for both road and track use.

But there are titanium exhaust downpipes by Akrapovič—terminating with a one-off muffler—and the radiator has been swapped for an endurance-spec item.

The PRAËM RR tips the scales at 20 kilos (44 lbs.) lighter than the standard bike, and the Berneron brothers have wasted no time enjoying the improved power-to-weight ratio on the track.

“We rode it at Circuit Paul Ricard in the south of France a few days ago,” says Sylvain, “and we have three more days of riding planned. We need to ride it 1,000 km before we can do a full race.”

A race? “We are trying to connect racing and customizing,” he explains. “Creating a race bike is a form of customizing—in the old days, a lot of race bikes were prototypes based on road bikes.

“Customizing is the same: you have a vision, and you make it happen to see how it works.”

The PRAËM S 1000 RR has now returned to BMW, and they probably won’t be letting go of it any time soon.

Frédéric Stik, BMW’s French general manager, is obviously pleased with the result: “Sylvain and Florent have managed to create what would have been the perfect race bike in the eighties. It’s a new and fresh vision of what can be done in the custom motorcycle field.”

If you want PRAËM to modify an S 1000 RR for you, they have all the facilities in-house apart from the paint.

“We can replicate this bike, as long as the donor machine comes to our workshop. The S 1000 RR is too complicated to be worked on by just anybody.”

We have one more burning question: is the PRAËM BMW road legal? “It depends on the country,” says Sylvain. “In France, as long as you don’t modify the ‘main construction’—the ground clearance, wheelbase, steering angle and so on—you can ride it. Maybe not in Germany though, as it is at the moment.”

If you want to see the bike in the metal, there will be plenty of opportunity in France this summer. The bike will be on display at the MotoGP, at Wheels and Waves in Biarritz, and at the Moto Legende show. It’ll also be one of the stars at the BMW Motorrad Days at Garmisch-Partenkirchen.

There is also a good chance, if the Berneron brothers get their way, you might see it being ridden in anger at a track day—just as it should be.


Fonte: BIKE EXIF

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Video de BMW Motorrad France deste projecto:

https://youtu.be/mpce9Zz-YRU
Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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Auto Fabrica London

BMW R80 Type 10

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By the late 1980s, the simple, classic styling of most BMW airheads had turned gawky. The R80 RT was especially afflicted: its enormous fairing and sticky-out mirrors pleased the long-distance riders, but few others.

Thirty years later, this makes the BMW R80 a prime candidate for the Auto Fabrica treatment. The English workshop specializes in a super-clean, minimalist look—the two-wheeled equivalent of a West Coast hot rod builder, if you like.

Shop boss Bujar Muharremi recalls the day the bike arrived. “Like many of these monoshock BMW R80s, it was fully faired-up—and a bit of a late 80s mess,” he says.

“But underneath is a relatively elegant tank and a boxer engine. We actually like the airhead engine. There are certain things that look odd, but it’s character building.”

Auto Fabrica gave the R80 a complete strip down, focusing on reducing weight. “We removed everything that we didn’t need, and worked around that.”

“The major decision was to keep the standard tank. Then we lowered the front end considerably: this gives the bike the ‘ass-up’ look and pushes the aesthetics towards a more aggressive style.”

It’s interesting to note that once that iconic tank is repositioned, the visual balance of the BMW splits into two. There’s the top part, which includes the tank and the seat, and the bottom half, which includes the wheels and engine.

“It essentially broke these two off, and revealed a void in the middle.”

The tank is subtly modified: it retains the recognizable BMW shape, but is now cleaner than a preacher on Sunday and finished in a gorgeous, deep blue color. The color sets off the tan seat, which is just long enough for a short two-up trip.

“We understood the need for the second rider but didn’t want to compromise the looks,” says Bujar. “The solution was to make removable passenger pegs, with hidden mounts. The best of both worlds.”

Instead of a traditional rear frame loop, Auto Fabrica wanted modern styling cues. So slender red acrylic fins now distribute the brake lighting, and tiny indicators are inserted into the end of the frame tubes. Underneath the light unit is a curved orange panel fabricated from aluminum.

The airbox has been modified to mimic the rear lighting, with staggered aluminum fins. It’s an unusual way to enhance the back of the blocky boxer engine and add a subtle custom touch.

The pipes are as simple as possible: hand-bent marine-grade SAE 316 stainless steel with internal custom baffles, two into two, and exiting on the same side.

“The R80 rides fantastic,” Bujar reports. “With the huge weight reduction and a rebuilt motor, it handles and goes really well. And the riding position is near enough perfect for a 6-foot person.”

It’s stunning build from a workshop at the top of its game. If you love airhead BMWs but don’t want a cookie-cutter custom, you know who to call.


Fonte: BIKE EXIF

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Amândio de Aveiro
(da Madeira, que já esteve em Oeiras e agora em Oslo)
R1150 GS [2002-2013]
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